CRC 1266 - Scales of Transformation

News


September 22, 2021

Rent-a-Scientist: Kiel archaeologists are visiting schools

Teaser-Bild Rent a Scientist
Fig. 1: Rent-A-Scientist (graphic: Wissenschafftzukunft Kiel)

This year, the "Rent-a-Scientist" program is part of the Night of Science KielRegion this week from September 20 to 24. Schools can invite a scientist from Kiel's universities to spend a day with them, giving students an exciting insight into the latest research. And, of course, archaeology is not to be missed.

Dr Jutta Kneisel (subproject D3) brings new findings and questions about the Bronze Age into schools several days. Here, the students learn everything about a Bronze Age burial mound in Bornhöved and life in general around 3,500 years ago. There is the possibility to see and touch authentic ceramics and great opportunities to slip into the role of an archaeologist yourself. 

Also, Dr Jan Piet Brozio (subproject C1) explains to the children what the 5,000-year-old stone graves in Schleswig-Holstein are all about. Who built these monuments, and what life was like in the Nordic Stone Age?

Dr Natalie Pickartz (subproject G2) explains what the magnetic field reveals about past settlements. With this method, traces of houses, villages and even building types can be identified without excavation. Geophysicists and archaeologists interpret the magnetic fields together, which also allows them to gain knowledge about the social structure of a settlement.

The students experience archaeology up close, personal and can ask the two experts their questions directly. And indeed, some of them will want to uncover the secrets of archaeology themselves - it's at least more exciting than doing homework... 


August 30, 2021

Past, Present, Future:

Archaeological Climate Summit in Kiel

Logo SACC

In order to discuss the global state of research on social archaeology and climate change, the Summit on Social Archaeology of Climate Change (SACC) will take place at Kiel University in Germany on 6 September 2021. The meeting is linked to the Kiel Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA), which will be organized this year from 6–11 September by the Johanna Mestorf Academy in a virtual format.

“The global consequences of climate change are omnipresent and have long since ceased to be a problem of the distant future” Kiel archaeologist Johannes Mueller and initiator of the summit explains. “However, the current discussion about the socio-ecological consequences of climate change often lacks a consideration of (pre)historical climate events and how the population of the time dealt with them. Yet, with the help of archaeological research, important lessons from these (pre)historical events can be used to better understand current transformation processes and build societal resilience” he adds.

The aim of the summit is to bring together international scientists and representatives of important international organisations in the fields of archaeology and heritage management to discuss and evaluate the contribution of archaeological research to understand the link between social, cultural, ecological and climatic change. The meeting will take place in the context of the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement and subsequent national and international strategies and initiatives.

Peter Biehl from the University of California, Santa Cruz, who has launched the initiative together with Johannes Mueller points out “The aim is to highlight how archaeology, through the study of past adaptive behaviour, is able to enhance socio-ecological resilience of societies as well as their adaptive capacity to current climate change.” Furthermore, contributing to the understanding of the impact of climate change on archaeological and heritage sites as well as on cultural landscapes, museums, collections, and archives is also an important aspect of the meeting. The results of the summit will subsequently be summarised and published in the form of a declaration on the state of archaeological heritage and research effected by climate change.

Original press release

Ausgrabung mit Archäologen
Fig. 1: Archaeological excavations worldwide like in Sultana, Romania, document the state of societies and the environment over millennia (Photo: J. Müller).

Archäologische Bohrung auf einem See
Fig. 2: Drilling lake sediments as part of an excavation opens up archives of environmental history (Sultana, Romania, Photo: J. Müller).

Mehrere Bohrkerne nebeneinanderFig. 3: The condition of sediments informs about environmental developments and human influences (Photo: W. Dörfler).

Luftaufnahme Wattenmeer mit archäologischer UntersuchungFig. 4: The Wadden Sea like many of the world's landscapes, including their archaeological heritage, are extremely vulnerable to climate change (Photo: T. Willershäuser, JGU Mainz)


July 09, 2021

Educational film Black Gold

Bucket flotation for archaebotanical investigations of archaeological dry soil sites

Film Black Diamonds
Fig.: Filmtitelpicture: Black Diamonds

A German-English educational film documenting archaeobotanical sample preparation on excavation was produced within the CRC1266 as a by-product of research into social and agricultural transformations in the Late Bronze Age in cooperation with the Cluster of Excellence EXC 2150 ROOTS. The professional film shoot was realised by Roman Adler from Kiel. The short film introduces archaeobotanical sample preparation, gives helpful and practical advice on safely handling archaeobotanical material.

The film accompanies the sample extraction on the CRC1266 excavation in Dobbin (Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania) under the direction of Dr Jutta Kneisel (D3). It explains the importance of archaeobotanical investigations for archaeological research. 

The search for old plant remains, i.e. archaeobotanical analyses, allows us to decipher the diet of the time and make statements about agriculture. In this case, the cooperation between archaeologists and archaeobotanists through the subprojects D3 and F3 of the CRC1266 expands the knowledge about an archaeological site and the living conditions and makes it possible to understand how everyday life was organised at that time.

The 11-minute short film shows the individual steps that each archaeobotanical sample has to go through - step by step and excellently explained, understandable for professionals and laymen. The advantage of bucket flotation, which is presented here by Prof. Dr. Kirleis and her team, is that the samples can be mudded near the excavation site - even in waters with extremely low water levels. Another advantage: instead of a 10-litre bucket full of sediment, only a sample bag with a sip of water needs to be brought to the laboratory! At the Institute for Prehistory and Early History, samples are washed and dried in the laboratory and then sorted and determined at the binocular - a microscope. 

With this educational film, a digital format is now available that can be used to prepare practical archaeobotanical exercises and archaeological excavations at universities, and can also be used for museum education and in the Kiel research workshop for pupils and teachers in the archaeo:lab.

You can watch the video via the Kiel University You Tube channel or download it here (soon).


June 24, 2021

Professorship for Quantitative Archaeology at Kiel University

Appointment strengthens research area at the Kiel Institute for Prehistory and Early History

Oliver Nakoinz
Fig.: The Kiel archaeologist, Oliver Nakoinz, has been appointed to a professorship of quantitative archaeology at Kiel University (CAU) (Photo: Oliver Nakoinz) 

The Kiel archaeologist, Dr. Oliver Nakoinz, has been appointed to an "außerplanmäßige" professorship for quantitative archaeology at Kiel University (Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel). In addition to his merits in archaeological research and teaching, his international reputation in the field of spatial-statistical archaeology was particularly decisive for the appointment.

As a scientist in the Johanna Mestorf Academy of the Kiel Institute for Prehistoric and Protohistoric Archaeology, Nakoinz is responsible for numerous projects. Among other things, his ground-breaking studies on spatial communication patterns in Celtic Southern Germany, which deal with the formation and networking of fortified Iron Age settlements, are to be highlighted. In addition, he heads the Integrated Research Training Group (IRTG) as well as a modelling project in the Kiel Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 1266 and, together with the University of Cambridge, the CRC project E4 on the interaction between Northern Italy, Southern Germany and Northern Germany in the 1st millennium BCE. The renowned book series “Quantitative Archaeology and Archaeological Modelling”, published by Springer, was developed by Nakoinz.

“The appointment as a professor of quantitative archaeology strengthens the development of this research area”, remarks Nakoinz happily. Quantitative archaeology addresses the structures, which are more or less concealed in archaeological data. These structures are made visible with mathematical and statistical concepts and, together with archaeological theories, generate new knowledge about the past.

One area of quantitative archaeology is pathway research. In this context, terrain data is used to calculate how a route between two locations should be theoretically conceived. “If you compare these theoretical paths with empirical evidence, such as burial mounds that can indicate paths, you can validate how well different models are adapted to reality. From this, one can infer which aspects were considered in prehistory when selecting a route,” explains Nakoinz. The models can convey the meaning of the empirical results. “This enables us to more easily understand why people in prehistory acted in a certain way,” explains the archaeologist.

For decades, quantitative archaeology has been implemented at Kiel University and, in the meantime, Kiel has developed into a leading location in this field, which is reflected, among other things, in the Initiative for Statistical Analysis in Archaeology Kiel (ISAAK) and in the newly founded Center for Interdisciplinary Data Science (CIDS). The participation of quantitative archaeology was also decisive for the approval of the Cluster of Excellence ROOTS and the SFB 1266, two scientific collaborative research projects funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG).

Original press release


June 7, 2021

On course to the pioneers of the North: PhD student Stine Detjens on board the RV Maria S. Merian 

Frau mit Maske und Helm auf einem Schiff
Stine Hildebrandt on board under pandemic conditions.

In January/ February 2021, Stine Detjens, PhD student from subproject B1 Pioneers of the North, participated in the research cruise MSM98/2 HELGLA+TAMPEN on board the research vessel Maria S. Merian. On the cruise, led by Dr Jens Schneider von Deimling, two independent topics were investigated: The determination of the spatial extent and age of the Tampen landslide and the detailed mapping of a glaciotectonic complex north of Helgoland.

At this point, the reader will surely ask: What does this have to do with archaeology?

At the end of the last ice age, however, the area between the European mainland and the British Isles had dried up and offered the pioneers of the north an attractive settlement area. The sea area around Helgoland is particularly interesting in this respect, as finds of stone tools from the famous red Heligoland flint prove the presence of humans in this area.

In the context of her PhD project, Stine Detjens is working on the reconstruction of palaeolandscapes of northern Germany and the German North Sea sector in the Late Glacial. In agreement with the AG Marine Geophysics & Hydroacoustics of the CAU, she is allowed to use the hydroacoustic data recorded during the expedition for her research in the future.

Logo mit Schiff und Karte im HintergrundLogo of the expedition


May 20, 2021

Over 160 applications for CRC 1266 research campaigns!

Our call for participants in CRC 1266 research excavations met with lively interest both nationally and internationally, from the Black Sea to the North Cape, from the Andes to the Baltic Coast.

Map of Europe and South America with coloured marked countries and pinsFig.: Over 166 applications from different countries for the CRC 1266 excavations (Graphic: C. Reckweg).

Thank you very much for your applications, the interested feedback and for distributing the call in your distribution lists. The projects take place under strict hygiene concepts. Of course, the health and safety of all participants are always our first priority. We will inform candidates soon about the status of their application. 


May 5, 2021

Swedish-German Science Cooperation – Award for CRC Archaeologist

Johannes Müller

Johannes Müller from the Institute for Prehistory and Early History at Kiel University, Germany. Prof. Müller is speaker of the Cluster of Excellence ROOTS and the Collaborative Research Center "Scales of Transformation". (Photo: Sara Jagiolla UFG Kiel)

The Swedish Riksbankens Jubileumsfond (RJ) has awarded Johannes Müller, Speaker of the CRC 1266, the 30th Humboldt Fellowship for outstanding German researchers. The award is granted annually on the recommendation of Swedish universities to researchers who have fostered the research cooperation between Scandinavia and Central Europe and presented excellent scientific results on Swedish and German research topics. The RJ is an independent Swedish foundation to promote the humanities and the social sciences.

Müller was nominated for the award by the University of Gothenburg, with whose Institute of Historical Sciences the Kiel researcher maintains scientific contacts on the archaeology of the Scandinavian and European region. Archaeological research in Gothenburg is characterized by projects on past societies that use novel methods to investigate the human-environment interaction of past societies. It thus has a similar focus to the successful Kiel archaeological collaborative projects.

"Archaeology in its holistic and long-term historical perspective, especially as humanities and natural science, offers the opportunity to better understanding the challenges of the modern world," Müller explains the scientific context. "Especially in collaboration with Gothenburg, we have shown that modern historical and archaeological research must answer questions about the sustainability of societies, conflict resolution and social inequality in an interdisciplinary way. We know that awareness of the past always has a political dimension. Instead of focussing on foreignness, violence, and disintegration, it is precisely the new results of archaeological research that make us aware that diversity, integration, and the desire for peace have always been crucial to human beings and human societies."

Since the beginning of April, Johannes Müller has now been at Gothenburg University to intensify the joint research work within the framework of the existing Swedish-German cooperation and to participate in several working groups. The research fellowship covers all costs of his six-month stay.

Original press release


May 3, 2021

A lecture series by Ben Krause-Kyora 

Die Ringvorlesung von Ben Krause-Kyora

A CRC 1266 contribution to the Kiel University lecture series “The Coronavirus pandemic and its consequences” by Ben Krause-Kyora (F4) on the topic "Epidemics as a motor of evolution since the Stone Age"  is now available on the Kiel University YouTube Channel

This exciting lecture explains the interaction in the genomic evolution of pathogens and humanity, but also the history of some pathogens. 

You can find more exciting lectures from this series here


April 7, 2021

Join us on our fieldwork in 2021!

Free Places on fieldworks of CRC1266 2021

This year the CRC 1266 is opening up access to spaces on our exciting fieldwork campaigns taking place across the world to external participants. In addition to involving students from our global partner institutions more directly in our active research, we also hope to contribute to the academic landscape by helping to provide further excavation or survey experience to students who may not have many options at their own institutions.

If you are interesting in joining us, please see the flyer for more details!


March 30, 2021

Think big! First digital retreat of the CRC 1266

Screenshot SFB 1266 Retreat

The first digital retreat of the CRC 1266 in 2021 took place on March 8th and 9th with about 70 participants. Under the retreat's guiding principle "Transformations as a basic element of human history: contributions by the CRC 1266," interdisciplinary and cross-subproject working groups were formed on diverse publication topics.

With the assignment to "Think big!", participants formulated a variety of excellent and inspiring publication ideas that illuminate the broad relevance of CRC 1266 research: From population dynamics to environmental and climate impacts to societal decisions.

The creative hustle and bustle was enabled by the conference venue hosted by Gather.Town, which allowed us all to feel like we were together in the same place. With individually-designed avatars, participants were able to explore the various spaces - from the lecture hall and group rooms to the forum and virtual lounge. During the breaks, participants could relax and have fun with a round of yoga or Tetris, and in the evening they were invited to the digital bar in the virtual lounge to finish off the day together.

The retreat thus forms the foundation for a CRC 1266 publication in which the question "How did people of the past experience and (not?) cope with the events and processes that changed the social and natural world around them?" will be examined from all sides of interdisciplinary CRC 1266 research.


February 09, 2021

First CRC 1266 PhD workshop was a great success

Screenshot SFB 1266 PhD-Workshop

The first digital PhD introductory workshop on February 03, 2021 was a great success! The focus of the meeting was to give the new PhD students the opportunity to present their PhD projects and to exchange intensively with the SFB 1266 members for the first time. Here, a wide range of exciting and central topics of the Collaborative Research Center were addressed by the PhD students: from questions on urbanity and dietary change, pathogens and their effects on bones, to Euclid's optics. We would like to thank all participants for this great workshop, the interested questions, lively discussions and the perseverance during this long day!


February 04, 2021

12th International Meeting for Phytolith Research (IMPR) at the EAA

12. International Meeting for Phytolith Research (IMPR) auf der EAA

The 12th International Meeting for Phytolith Research (IMPR) of the International Phytolith Society, integrated into the 27th annual meeting of the European Association for Archaeologists (EAA), will take place in Kiel from 8-12 September 2021.  
The CRC 1266 members Marta Dal Corso (D1), Wiebke Kirleis (D1, F2F3F5) and Stefan Dreibrodt (F2, D1) are responsible for the local organisation. Within the framework of the IMPR, seven sessions will be held with a focus on phytolith-analysis:

Session #246 - IMPR – Phytoliths in integrated archaeobotanical and ethnoarchaeological studies

Session #251 - IMPR – Phytolith identification, classification and morphometry

Session #256 - IMPR – Phytoliths biogeochemistry - From phytoliths formation and role in modern plants to new proxies for archaeology and palaeoecology

Session #319 - IMPR – Phytoliths in geoarchaeology and micromorphology

Session #340 - IMPR - Phytoliths as a Proxy for Palaeoenvironmental Reconstruction

Session #342 - IMPR - Microscopy Session: Phytoliths in Soil Thin Sections

Session #326 - Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Phytoliths (But Were Afraid...): Their Contribution to the Modeling of Past Human Behavior

Phytoliths are microscopic silica structures that occur in different plant tissues and remain even after the organic material has decayed. This makes them particularly interesting for archaeological and palaeoenvironmental research all over the world and serves to answer environmental archaeological questions. As a discipline that overarches the border between the natural sciences and the humanities, phytolith-analysis connects international scientists and a wide range of fields of research. The IMPR will bring together experts in archaeobotany, ethnobotany, geoarchaeology, biogeochemistry, biology, ecology and palaeoontology to discuss methodological advances and applications in the phytolith research.

Abstracts must be submitted by 11 February via the EAA website. Updates on the IMPR can be found here.

Contact: Dr. Marta Dal Corso 12impr@email.uni-kiel.de


January 28, 2021

EAA 2021 - 27th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists Widening Horizons, Kiel

Logo EAA 2021, Kiel

Sessions with CRC 1266 involvement:

Session #202 ANCIENT CULTURAL ROUTES: PAST TRANSPORTATION AS A TWO-WAY INTERACTION BETWEEN SOCIETY AND ENVIRONMENT
Francesca Mazzilli, Tomáš Glomb, Francesca Fulminante, Franziska Faupel (Z1)

Session #222 LOST IN TRANSLATION: TRANSFORMED AND FORGOTTEN KNOWLEDGE
Jutta Kneisel (D3), Charlotte Damm, Berit Valentin Eriksen (B1)

Session #228 AGRICULTURAL CHANGE AND SOCIAL INEQUALITY: APPROACHING COMPLEXITY
Tim Kerig (F6), Jutta Lechterbeck, Fynn Wilkes

Session #231 EMBRACING CHANGE: NEW INSIGHTS AND THEORIES ON THE CHANGING “EUROPEAN WORLDS” FROM THE 3RD AND 2ND MILLENNIUM BC
Ana Catarina Basílio, Paula Becerra Fuello, Jan-Eric Schlicht (A1)

Session #246 IMPR – PHYTOLITHS IN INTEGRATED ARCHAEOBOTANICAL AND ETHNOARCHAEOLOGICAL STUDIES
Marta Dal Corso (D1), Welmoed Out

Session #256 IMPR – PHYTOLITHS BIOGEOCHEMISTRY - FROM PHYTOLITHS FORMATION AND ROLE IN MODERN PLANTS TO NEW PROXIES FOR ARCHAEOLOGY AND PALAEOECOLOGY
Stefan Dreibrodt (D1, F2)Marta Dal Corso (D1), Alexandre Chevalier

Session #267 HISTORY OF MEASURING AND CALCULATIONS IN ARCHAEOLOGY
Sébastien Plutniak, Oliver Nakoinz (E4), Tim Kerig (F6), Aleksandr Diachenko

Session #296 TRACING PREHISTORIC HUNTER-GATHERERS IN THEIR ENVIRONMENT: CHALLENGES AND PERSPECTIVES FOR PROSPECTING ELUSIVE LIFEWAYS [PaM; Archaeological Prospection]
Philippe De Smedt, Erica Corradini (G2), Petra Schneidhofer, Jeroen Verhegge

Session #315 CONFLICT ESCALATION AND DE-ESCALATION IN URBANITY
Anna Loy, Victoria Alliata (E4), Paweł Cembrzyński, Camilla Zeviani

Session #337 DECIPHERING TURNING POINTS IN HUMAN-ENVIRONMENTAL INTERACTION
Ingo Feeser (F2), Stefan Dreibrodt (D1, F2), Jakub Niebieszczański, Vincent Robin, Julian Wiethold

Session #340 IMPR - PHYTOLITHS AS A PROXY FOR PALAEOENVIRONMENTAL RECONSTRUCTION
Ákos Peto, Wiebke Kirleis (D1, F2, F3, F5)

Session #359 FOOD CULTURES IN ANCIENT SOCIETIES
Lucy Kubiak-Martens, Wiebke Kirleis (D1, F2, F3, F5)

Session #411 A COMMUNITY OF ANCESTORS: THE URNFIELD PHENOMENON IN NORTHERN EUROPE
Helene Agerskov Rose (G1), Lisbeth Christensen, Niels Møller, Guy De Mulder, Arjan Louwen

Session #421 DEMOGRAPHY IN ARCHAEOLOGY BEYOND BOOM AND BUST? CRITICAL EXAMINATIONS OF PHASES OF UNDER- AND OVERPOPULATION
Martin Hinz, Jan Kolář, Caroline Heitz, Julian Laabs (F6)

Session #428 ADULT AGE-AT-DEATH IN PAST POPULATIONS: WIDENING HORIZONS OF METHODS, APPROACHES AND INTERPRETATIONS
Katharina Fuchs (F4), Nils Müller-Scheessel, Christoph Rinne (D2), Isabelle Séguy

Session #432 PERSPECTIVES ON BRONZE AGE CHANGES
Stefanie Schaefer-Di Maida (D3), Hendrik Raese, Dragana Filipovic (F3), Anne Lene Melheim

Session #445 DIGITAL METHODS AND TYPOLOGY: NEW HORIZONS
Gianpiero Di Maida, Christian Horn, Stefanie Schaefer-Di Maida (D3)

Session #479 From Climate Change to Activism: How Can European Hunter-Gatherer Archaeology Contribute towards Broader Contemporary Debates? [PaM]
Benjamin Elliott, Astrid Nyland, Graeme Warren, Henny Piezonka (A1)

Session #486 Hunter-Fisher Social Ecology in Forested Environments: Approaching Boreal Naturecultures
Tanja Schreiber, Henny Piezonka (A1), Kerkko Nordqvist, Natalya Chairkina, Barry Taylor

Session #492 SCIENTISTS, SUBMITTERS AND SCROUNGERS: ALTERNATIVE VIEWS ON RADIOCARBON DATING IN ARCHAEOLOGY
John Meadows (G1)Helene Agerskov Rose (G1), Rowan McLaughlin

Session #493 ‘HOW THE NEOLITHIC CREATED THE BRONZE AGE’: NEOLITHIC SOCIETIES OF EUROPE ON THE EVE OF METALLURGY
Jan Piet Brozio (C1), Niels Johannsen

Session #504 NEWS FROM THE BRONZE AGE – SCALING DYNAMICS AND NARRATIVES
Laura Burkhardt, Mirco Brunner, Julian Laabs (F6), Ken Massy

Session #543 MATERIAL MINDS: EXPLORING THE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN CULTURAL ARTEFACTS, MATERIAL CUTLURE AND EMBODIED MIND
Felipe Criado-Boado, Johannes Müller (C1, D1, F5, F6)

Session #684 IMAGINATIONS AND IMAGINARIES OF THE PALAEOLITHIC AND MESOLITHIC – DISTORTED VIEWS, EMBELLISHMENT, AND WHAT WE MAKE OF IT [PaM]
Sonja Grimm (B1), Shumon Hussain

Session #688 SOCIETY FACING CHANGES. REGIONS ON THE SOUTHWEST BALTIC BETWEEN 2500 - 1500 BC
Janusz Czebreszuk, Johannes Müller (C1, D1, F5, F6), Marzena Szmyt


Jan 28, 2021

“Who knows that?” or better “Who invented it?!”
Lothar Matthäus bei „Wer weiß denn sowas?“

This is what Lothar Matthäus failed at, and we invented it!

In episode 626 of the well-known ARD quiz show "Wer weiß denn sowas?", broadcast on January 6 2021, the former world football player Lothar Matthäus, together with his quiz partner Bernhard Hoëcker and despite the support of the telephone joker Dominik Hoffmann, failed on the following question:

Due to the brain's tendency, known in psychology, to direct its own attention to the left rather than to the right, ...?

A - the first violins have been sitting to the left of the conductor since the 19th century.

B - in the Stone Age, new settlements were built slightly rotated to the left.

C - the right side of paintings was darker in the Romantic period.

The three agreed on A as the right answer. But the correct answer is, of course, B!       
The question picks up recently published results of CRC 1266-subproject C2 . It was shown, that newly built houses in Neolithic settlements of the Linearbandkeramik are slightly rotated to the left in the longitudinal direction compared to the previous house generation. We relate this to the effect known as pseudoneglect, which favours the left visual field over the right. We are excited about how quickly our scientific results have been transferred into everyday knowledge in this case.

By the way, Lothar Matthäus and his teammates could have justifiably objected. While the resolution shown in the video correctly reflects the explanation, the question is not precisely posed: It is not the settlements that are built slightly rotated, it is the houses. Furthermore, the question should have referenced the "Neolithic" instead of only "Stone Age". However, the team, perplexed by the answer, obviously did not notice this.

The whole sequence of questions can be found here (unfortunately without the explanatory video).

Original publication:    
Müller-Scheeßel, N., Müller, J., Cheben, I., Mainusch, W., Rassmann, K., Rabbel, W., Corradini, E. and Furholt, M. (2020). A new approach to the temporal significance of house orientations in European Early Neolithic settlements. PLOS ONE 15: e0226082. ·  https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0226082 

The publication is available online for free


Jan 25.01.2021

CRC 1266 PhDs get started…

PhDs getting started

First Introductory Workshop for CRC 1266 PhD candidates

On February 3rd 2021 the first digital CRC PhD workshop will take place. We look forward to learning more about the doctoral projects of the 18 PhD students from short presentations and hope for a lively exchange and fruitful discussions. 

PROGRAMME pdf


 Jan 04, 2021

Obituary – Stanislav Ţerna ( 29.12.2020)

Stanislav Terna

We mourn the death of our friend and archaeologist Stanislav Ţerna, who died on 29.12.2020 as a result of a tragic traffic accident. We lose a colleague, friend and scientist who had only lived in Kiel for a short time. He was employed here as a scientist in the Collaborative Research Centre 1266 at the Institute for Prehistoric and Protohistoric Archaeology, conducting research on aspects of the Southeastern and Eastern European Neolithic and Chalcolithic, in particular the Tripolye site of Stolniceni in Moldova. We had known Stanislav Ţerna since the Maidanetske excavation campaign in Ukraine in 2014, and since then we repeatedly worked with him on various archaeological surveys and excavations. We came to know and appreciate him as a warm-hearted, cheerful and polyglot person and a passionate and imaginative scientist.
Stanislav Ţerna began his academic career at the High Anthropological School University in Chişinău, where he graduated with a Bachelor's degree from the Faculty of Anthropology in 2007 and defended his thesis on anthropomorphic representations of the Cucuteni Tripolye culture, supervised by Prof. Igor Manzura. In 2008, he obtained a Master's degree in Anthropology at the same university, specialising in the history and culture of European civilisations. His thesis dealt with anthropomorphic sculptures from the Romanian settlements of Hăbăşeşti and Trusheşti. As his numerous articles and several book publications show, the subject of anthropomorphic representations of the Cucuteni-Tripolye complex was one of Stanislav Ţerna’s main fields of research.
Stanislav Ţerna was born in Moldova and carried the warmth and cheerfulness of this region. Everyone who met him was fascinated by his liveliness, energy, sociability, knowledge and enthusiasm for archaeology. His origins and his communicative and linguistic talent made him a border crosser and mediator between Eastern and Western scientific worlds. This international cross-border orientation is reflected, among other things, in internships and research fellowships at the Eurasia Department of the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin, the Brandenburg State Office for the Preservation of Monuments, the Archaeological Service of the Canton of Bern in Switzerland and the Graduate School "Human Development in Landscapes" at Kiel University. Moreover, he was also editor and co-editor of important scientific journals such as “Revista Arheologică” and “Stratum Plus”. 
Stanislav Ţerna has made important contributions to the study of the Neolithic and the Cucuteni-Tripolye complex of the Carpathian-Dnepr region: In cooperation with partners of the Romano-Germanic Commission of the German Archaeological Institute, the University of Regensburg and Kiel University, he organised diverse field research and thereby contributed to the clarification of Linear Pottery and Cucuteni-Tripolye settlement patterns, among other things. The focus of his research in recent years has been the large Tripolye settlement of Stolniceni in Moldova, where extensive and modern prospections and excavations have been carried out under his direction. It is decisively due to his archaeological skills and positive character that this research was not only very successful but that he was also able to win the hearts and the high regard of his colleagues and the local workers.
Unfortunately, beside his immense record Stanislav Ţerna was not able to complete so many important projects he had started. We mourn his early death and would like to express our condolences to his wife Andrea, his family and his friends. We miss you, Stas!
 
For the Kiel colleagues
 
Johannes Müller, Wiebke Kirleis, Robert Hofmann, Mila Shatilo, Marta Dal Corso
 

Dec 09, 2020

CRC 1266 member as expert on Planet Wissen (WDR, SWR, ARD-alpha)

Planet Wissen Gespräch

The Bronze Age in Central Europe (about 2200 - 800 B.C.) is the main topic of the episode “Bronzezeit – Die vergessene Epoche” of the scientific television show Planet Wissen. It demonstrates that the Bronze Age should not be forgotten under any circumstances and that the 1400 year period between the Stone Age and the Iron Age brought forth exciting technical innovations and social structures. Dr. Jutta Kneisel, researcher in  the CRC 1266 (D3) was invited to the studio as an expert. Together with Prof. Dr. Philipp W. Stockhammer (Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich), she informs the audience, for instance, about people's everyday life, the way they dealt with conflicts, and the special role of women in the Bronze Age.

Available online in the ARD-Mediathek, the BR-Mediathek and via the Planet Wissen Homepage.


Nov 30, 2020

CRC 1266 archaeobotanist at the digital 8th McDonnell Academy International Symposium

McDonnell-Symposium

On Saturday, 7th November 2020, the 8th McDonnell Academy International Symposium of Washington University in St. Louis took place, with the title "The Origin of Eurasian Foodways and Cuisines: Environmental challenges and culinary solutions to good globalization in prehistory". 

The digital workshop brought together international scientists to discuss the spread of different crops between 5,000 and 1,500 BC and its impact on prehistoric societies and the environment. The outcome of the workshop will help improve understanding of the prehistoric roots of Eurasian foodways and cuisines, and may also contribute to a deeper awareness of current and future challenges to food security. The CRC 1266 was also represented at the workshop by Dragana Filipovic (F3). Based on various examples, she considered the influence of the spread of millet (Panicum miliaceum) in Europe from the mid-2ndmillennium BC. This spread had effects that are reflected in the palaeoecological and archaeological record in different regions of Europe.


Nov 20, 2020

3rd North German Stone Age Round Table... virtual

Steinzeitrunde
Studying lithic artefacts together

On November 27th from 10am-3pm, the 3rd North German Stone Age Round Table organised by members of Knowledge ROOTS and the B1 and C1 projects of the CRC 1266 will take place in a BBB room hosted by Kiel University. 

The North German Stone Age Round Table brings together about 20-30 experts every year on the Friday before the 1st Advent. Young and experienced scholars from higher education, research, museum, and government departments who are interested in Stone Age topics or work on current research projects, theories, museum projects, and theses related to the Stone Age of Northern Germany (Lower Saxony, Bremen, Hamburg, Schleswig-Holstein, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Brandenburg, Berlin) meet here. In particular, this informal meeting is intended to provide an opportunity for discussion, exchange, and networking, which is why the lectures are explicitly kept short in order to provide sufficient time for questions and thoughts.

After Rostock (2018) and Wilhelmshaven (2019), the Stone Age Round Table was supposed to take place at Kiel University in 2020. However, due to the current provisions for containing the pandemic, the meeting had to be converted to an online format. At present, 10 lectures (see programme) covering topics from the Palaeolithic to the Bronze Age and 22 participants from seven institutions are registered. Interested colleagues are welcome to attend and may contact Sonja B. Grimm (sonja.grimm@zbsa.eu) or Moiken Hinrichs (mhinrichs@roots.uni-kiel.de) for further details.


Oct 29, 2020

Welcome to the CRC 1266! First General Assembly of Phase 2

Mitgliederversammlung des SFB1266 in LS1

On Friday 23rd October the CRC 1266 gathered together both in person and online for the 2020 General Assembly. This hybrid event was a chance for new members to learn more about the CRC 1266 and their future research perspectives, as well as to be introduced to everyone else for the first time. We were also pleased to welcome the new president of Kiel University, Prof. Dr. med. Simone Fulda, as a special guest.

CAU-Präsidentin Simone Fulda

In addition, past successes were highlighted and the way forward for phase 2 was outlined.

After the meeting those present in person also enjoyed a socially-distanced and masked open-air reception to celebrate the continuation of the CRC 1266 and the start of phase 2.

Open-air reception

For more pictures, please click here.


Oct 09, 2020

Rent-a-(CRC 1266)Scientist, Night of Science, 27.11.2020
 

Rent-a-ScientistWe are pleased to announce that the CRC 1266 will be represented at the event “Rent a Scientist: Wissenschaft macht Schule” as part of the Night of Science (in German, 27.11.2020, held by KielRegion and Kiel Sailing City). Schools can book scientists for a class until 23.10.2020.

The CRC 1266 will be represented by:


We wish all participants an enjoyable Night of Science.


Aug 21, 2020

CRC 1266 at the 26th EAA Virtual Annual Meeting, 24-30 August 2020
 

Europäischer Archäologie-Kongress 2020

Under the motto #Networking, the first virtual EAA Annual Meeting will take place next week, from 24-30 August. In spite of the COVID-19 pandemic, archaeologists from Europe and all over the world will meet in virtual space in order not to let the scientific exchange and their networks come to a stop in difficult times.

Despite a reduced scientific program due to the cancellation of some sessions, CRC 1266 will be represented by a large number of its members at the 26th EAA, who will present their research and research results made within CRC 1266. For those who do not yet know which lectures or sessions they would like to attend during this year's EAA, the “CRC 1266 at the EAA 2020 schedule” provides information on when and where lectures by CRC 1266 members and sessions co-organised by CRC 1266 members will take place. 

We are especially pleased about the keynote lecture by Maria Wunderlich, PI of the subprojects A1 and C2, on Sunday, August 30, 2020, entitled "An orchestra of meanings - Is it possible to understand the multilayered character of past human social organization?".

We wish all speakers, participants and organisers a successful EAA 2020! 

For further information on the conference or to register to participate in the EAA 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting, please visit the event website.


July 28, 2020

German Archaeology Congress (DAK) 21.-24.09.2020 goes digital!
 

Deutscher Digitaler Archäologie-Kongress 2020

As the first digital archaeology congress in Germany, this year's  German Archaeology Congress (DAK) will take place from 21.-24.09.2020. Under the motto "Horizons", the Archaeological State Office of Schleswig-Holstein in Schleswig, the Institute of Prehistoric and Protohistoric Archaeology, Kiel University, the Museum of Archaeology Gottorf Castle in Schleswig and the Centre for Baltic and Scandinavian Archaeology invite archaeologists from Germany, Europe and all around the world to expand and create new horizons.

Within the framework of the DAK2020, the session »Der SFB 1266 TransformationsDimensionen: Mensch-Umwelt-Wechselwirkungen in prähistorischen und archaischen Gesellschaften« will take place Monday, 21stSeptember, where members of the CRC 1266 will present their research. The session is open to all interested and offers an insight into the activities and research results of the CRC 1266.

Registation is possible here.


July 22, 2020

New positions for the 2nd phase of the CRC 1266

job vacancies

For the second CRC phase a number of positions are available. Within the CRC 1266 the following positions are to be filled at the earliest possible date: 19 research positions (m/f/d) with the opportunity to prepare a PhD; 4 Postdoc (research associate) positions (m/f/d); 4 technical-administrative service positions (m/f/d) (scientific coordination, project management, IT systems technology); 1 press and public outreach position (m/f/d).


June 05, 2020

The CRC 1266 is prolonged for the 2nd Phase

Logo CRC1266

On May, 29th 2020 the German Research Foundation (DFG) announced the prolongation of the CRC 1266 "Scales of Transformation - Human-Environmental Interaction in Prehistoric and Archaic Societies" for another four years, running from 2020-2024. 

The funding of the 2nd CRC 1266 phase is a great acknowledgement of the joint efforts of all CRC 1266 members, the cooperative spirit that carried us all the way through, and the sound scientific results gained so far. In the last four years, it was in particular the intensive cooperation with our national and foreign cooperation partners that gave the CRC wings. This can now be continued!

In particular our PhDs and Postdocs, who are one of the backbones of the CRC 1266, deserve utmost thanks for their enormous engagement. A combination of learning and research was important for them: In the end of the day they made their way in an interdisciplinary scientific environment, which at the beginning of their jobs was quite new for a majority of them. The mutual learning of the Principal Investigators from each other and with each other was also a key to success: In contrast to the atomisation that can sometimes be observed even in the scientific field, it was and is teamwork that led us to success.

We are very much looking forward to continuing our cooperation, are confident to consolidate our 1st phase results, and burn for reaching out to new scientific horizons. The 2nd phase of the CRC 1266 will focus on pattern recognition of prehistoric and archaic transformations and possible results are increasingly important with regard to the current global crisis.


April 09, 2020

CRC 1266 goes digital: Biweekly Colloquia and Lunchtime Seminars in virtual space

CRC1266 digital

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic many formats of the university and our daily life are moving towards the virtual space and same is the CRC 1266 doing.

The CRS 1266’s (co-)organized biweekly lecture series Lunchtime Seminars and the Biweekly Colloquia are now offered as a web conference format in Zoom open for all interested people.

For more information on the Biweekly Colloquia see here.
For more information on the Lunchtime Seminars see here.


April 09, 2020

German Congress of Archaeology 21-25.09.2020 in Kiel

DAK2020 in Kiel

This year's German Archaeology Congress (DAK) will take place from 21-25.09.2020 at the University of Kiel. Under the motto "Horizons", the Archaeological State Office of Schleswig-Holstein in Schleswig, the Institute of Prehistoric and Protohistoric Archaeology of the Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, the Museum of Archaeology Gottorf Castle in Schleswig and the Centre for Baltic and Scandinavian Archaeology invite archaeologists from Germany, Europe and all around the world to expand and create new horizonts.

Within the framework of the DAK2020, the session "SFB TransformationsDimensions in Prehistoric and Archaic Societies" will take place in the afternoon of Tuesday, September 22nd, where members of the SFB 1266 will present their research. The session is open to all who are interested and offers an insight into the activities and research results of the SFB 1266.

Registation is possible here.

Information about the DAK2020 - due to the unclear situation regarding the COVID-19 pandemic - can be found on the DAK2020 website.


April 09, 2020

EAA 2021 is coming to Kiel!

Kiel from above

The 27th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA) will take place in Kiel from 8-11 September 2021. On 26 March 2020 the Memorandum of Understanding between the EAA and the JMA was signed in Prague by Felipe Criado-Boado, president of the EAA, and Johannes Müller, speaker of the Johanna Mestorf Academy (JMA) and CRC 1266.


March 08, 2020

POSTPONED TO AN UNKNOWN DATE!

International Workshop "Upheaval before the upheaval?" / "Umbruch vor dem Umbruch?"

International Workshop

In archaeology, upheavals represent phases of profound transformation that have preoccupied researchers for over a century in almost all (pre-)historical periods.

The CRC 1266 participates in the international workshop "Upheaval before the upheaval?" / "Umbruch vor dem Umbruch?" together with the Universities of Basel, Erlangen, Cologne and Bergen, as well as with the State Office for the Preservation of Historical Monuments in the Regional Council of Stuttgart.  The aim of the workshop is to investigate transformations in the late 4th and early 3rd millennium BCE within local groups and their global networks in the regions between the North Sea and the Alpine Space.

The workshop will take place at the Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg. The more than 15 contributions will present new research results from different regions during chronological phases which are preceding the transition to the so-called Beaker phenomenon. A (preliminary) program in German is available here.

On the part of the CRC 1266, the subprojects C1 and D2 are chronologically and geographically connected to the topic of the workshop.

Due to the situation of the COVID-19 Pandemic the workshop needed to be postponed to a now unkown date!

Organization: Clara Drummer, Philipp Gleich, Renate Ebersbach, Daniela Hofmann, Doris Mischka, Silviane Scharl

Email: Workshop3000@gmx.de


February 24, 2020

Marie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellowship for CRC 1266 researcher

Sampling at the excavation site

Jos Kleijne, who conducted his PhD research in Kiel as part of the Graduate School “Human Development in Landscapes” (GSHDL) and additionally worked as a postdoc for the subproject C1 of the CRC 1266 on Neolithic transformations during the later 3rd millennium BC over the past year-and-a-half just received the wonderful news that his application for the Marie Skłodkowska-Curie Individual Fellowship (MSCA-IF) was granted!

He will be working for two years at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands with Hans Huisman and Daan Raemaekers on his project “MicroTRASH: Microscopic transformations in arable land and shell midden habitation in coastal northern Europe during the later 4th and 3rd millennium BC.” Within this project he will study the microscopic and chemical traces of past subsistence activities within a period characterised by large cultural and socio-economic transformations. His project will run for two years, probably from January 2021 onwards. We are sad to see him leave our institute but we are looking forward to a fruitful collaboration in the future.

Photo: Sampling at the excavation site "Riņņukalns" in Latvia. The excavation was organisd by the University of Riga and the ZBSA in Schleswig. (Copyright Liga Palma, 2018)


February 24, 2020

CRC 1266 member at ARTE and Terra X

Dr. Julia Katharina Koch on the show

In March 2020, the programme of the French-German television channel ARTE will focus on women. This includes the search for the female part in human history between neolithisation and urbanisation. This is explored in the documentary film „Geschlechterkonflikt – Frauenbilder der Geschichte“ (Gender Conflict - Images of Women in History), produced by Gebrüder Beetz Filmproduktion GmbH & Co. KG on behalf of ZDF/ARTE, first broadcast on 7 March 2020. For the main interview on the current state of Gender Archaeology, our senior researcher Julia K. Koch was asked to conduct the interview in spring 2019; the interview took place in July at the Archaeological Museum Hamburg.

Broadcast dates:

Geschlechterkonflikt – Frauenbilder der Geschichte
52 min. TV documentary on ARTE
07 March 2020 at 21:05

TERRA X: Mächtige Männer – Ohnmächtige Frauen? Neue Fakten aus der Vergangenheit
43 min. TV documentary on ZDF
21 June 2020 at 19:30


January 6, 2020

Workshop "Millet - and what else?" in Kiel

Millet Workshop

The international workshop “Millet and what else? The wider context of the adoption of millet cultivation in Europe” took place in Kiel from the 27-28th November. The workshop marked the closing of the ‘Millet Dating Programme’ and celebrated the large collaborative work of the European archaeobotanical community, while also providing a roadmap for future research and collaborations. Over 20 invited workshop participants – archaeobotanists, archaeological scientists, zooarchaeologists, ethnographers – talked about the dietary, economic and cultural context of the period in which the new crop, broomcorn millet (Panicum miliaceum), was introduced in Europe from regions to the east. They presented new results of the application of the state-of-the-art methods (such as stable isotope and biomolecular analysis) that trace millet consumption and millet meals in archaeological deposits, and discussed the agronomic and technological aspects of millet cultivation.

Photo: Session during the workshop. (Photo: D. Filipovic)


January 6, 2020

Discourses on narratives and hard data: CRC 1266-Retreat

Retreat Rendsburg

A two-day retreat of the CRC 1266 in Rendsburg on 28-29 October 2019 took place in a productive atmosphere. The CRC 1266 community came together to summarize the results of the past months and to intensively discuss cross-connections between the subprojects in terms of content. The focus was on setting up new cross-sectional groups, discussing the new contexts and formulating scientific narratives. In the overall summaries, more concrete questions arose regarding the decisions of the transformation anatomy: new studies on settlement behaviour, new aspects of resilience to climatic and social changes and detailed studies on the aspect of "integrative architecture" were elaborated.


 

More articles in the archive

Geomagnetic surveys and surface inspections near Segeberg

Currently, first fieldwork in the area of a Bronze Age burial ground near Bornhöved is in progress.

Extensive geomagnetic prospection
Extensive geomagnetic prospection of the Bronze Age burial ground near Bornhöved (Photo: Stefanie Schaefer).

Current field researches of the project D3 are concerned with geomagnetic prospections and surface inspection in the near of the Bronze Age burial ground at Bornhöved. References to structures in soil have already been compared with data from previous investigations. Remains of grave mounds and other soil findings are distinguished by geomagnetic figures. Some surface finds also suggest that in this area there were not only burial activities, but also settlements. The surveys take place continuously this winter. Excavations are planned for spring.

Fieldwork in the area of Duvenseer Moor

With comprehensive sedimentological analyses and georadar measurements ongoing research of the Mesolithic in the Duvenseer Moor is continued.

Fieldwork in the area of Duvenseer Moor
Drilling cores from the westen part of the Duvenseer Moor provide comprehensive palaeoecological archives (Photo: Daniel Groß)..

In collaboration with project F2 and G2 first fieldwork took place in the Duvenseer Moor, which is the central study area of project B2 “Transitions of Specialized Foragers”. Combined drilling and georadar investigations focusing on the western part of the area will gain information about the former lake basin, the sedimentation process of the fen and aims at discovering new Mesolithic camp sites.

Fieldwork and excavation: Westlicher Oldenburger Graben

In summer 2016, the excavation of a Neolithic settlement site revealed organic preservation in the Oldenburger Ditch.

Activities Oldenburger Graben
Careful excavation of a 2 m long wooden artefact with revealed tool marks (Photo: Jan Piet Brozio).

In cooperation with projects F2, F3 und G2, he C1 project started with geophysical prospections, excavations and paleoecological researches on a Neolithic site with wetland preservation in the Western Oldenburger Ditch (Westlicher Oldenburger Graben) in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. The landscape of the Oldenburger Ditch changed in time and was used and formed by settlements and burials from Mesolithic to Bronze Age time. The younger Neolithic site which was excavated is located on a peninsula in a former lagoon situation. Peat and organic silt preserved organic artefacts such as wood in the former coastal zone. Furthermore, other special findings are arrow shafts and parts of wooden constructions. On the peninsula, several postholes of houses and settlement pits were documented. Concentrations of flint artefacts refer to activity areas in the settlement tool production. The site is one of several Neolithic settlements on islands, peninsulas and the lagoon periphery of the prehistoric Oldenburger Ditch.

The local newspaper Kieler Nachrichten report on the fieldwork in the Western Oldenburg Ditch:

KN online article

http://www.kn-online.de/News/Aktuelle-Nachrichten-Schleswig-Holstein/Nachrichten-Schleswig-Holstein/Ausgrabungen-in-Oldenburg-Ein-langes-Stueck-Geschichte

Video with aerial view during the excavation process

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jK36kwdFEh8

Activities Oldenburger Graben Luftbild
The excavation area from bird's eye view. In the background you see the lake “Wesseker See“ and the bay “Hohwachter Bucht” of the Baltic sea (Photo: Kieler Nachrichten).

Activities Oldenburger Graben Messung
In order to select the specific study area, methods of geophysical prospection were applied before the excavation started (Photo: Jan Piet Brozio).

Linear pottery settlement archaeology in southwestern Slovakia

Extensive excavation and fieldwork deliver first results of early sedentism and settlement dynamiks in the Carpathian Basin..

Activities settlement southwestern Slovakia
Vráble 'Vel'ké Lehemby'. Excavation trenches of 2016 from a height of roughly 60 m. The features of planum 1 are marked in red (Picture: Martin Furholt).

This year's excavation campaign of project C2 lasted from the 1st of August to the 29th of September and took place in one of the house groupings within the eastern Early Neolithic settlements of Vráble 'Vel'ké Lehemby'. In four trenches an area of roughly 2300 sqm containing four houses was uncovered. Apart from the typical long pits flanking the houses numerous postholes as well as a couple of bee-hive shaped storage pits were discovered. The most spectacular find consisted of a human skeleton (male, 20+) which was deposited at the border of one of the long pits and which lower legs and feet had been removed, probably in the course of the recutting of the pit.


Activities Siedlung Suedwestslowakei Skelett
Vráble 'Vel'ké Lehemby', trench 14. Human skeleton, the lower legs and feet are disturbed. The right arm is placed behind the spine (Photo: Martin Furholt).

Excavation and collection of botanical macro remains in Hungary

International project collaboration of the CRC in the course of the investigation of a Middle Bronze Age settlement (Vatya Culture).

Activities Ungarn
Work begins in Trench 2 in 2016. Features in the southern part of the house are being excavated, the excavated soil is being sieved in the background to ensure the best possible artefact recovery, and photographs of special finds are being taken (Photo: N. Taylor)..

The excavations of a Middle Bronze Age Vatya Culture house (1913 – 1527 cal. BCE) at Kakucs-Turján, Hungary were completed in early September 2016. The botanical samples from the site will be analysed in the frame of a PhD thesis by Sonja Filatova as part of the CRC sub-project F3. Some carbonised plant macro-remains have been sent for radiocarbon dating already, in order to refine the chronology of the site. The excavations are planned to continue in Summer 2017, as part of the on-going co-operation with the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and Adam Mickiewicz University Poznań.

Recently published: Interdisciplinary research on a gallery grave of the Late Neolithic Wartberg (3350-2900 calBC)

Galeriegrab der spätneolithischen Wartberggruppe
Cribra orbitalia, symptoms of increased blood production (haematopoiesis) in the orbital roof of a 3-4 year old child buried in the gallery grave of Niedertiefenbach (Photo: S. Jagiolla).

An interdisciplinary pilot study conducted by scientists from the CAU Kiel, University of Zurich and the Landesamt für Denkmalpflege Hessen focused on precise 14C dating of the gallery grave as well as palaeopathological, dental and pathogenic evidence of diseases. Members of the CRC sub-projects D2 and F4 are involved in this study, which has recently been published in the Prähistorische Zeitschrift (in German, with English summary).

Founded by the Graduate School „Human Development in Landscapes“ in the scope of a pilot study for the CRC 1266, the research approach combined established archaeological and palaeopathological methods with new diagnostic tools, such as the application of a CAD/CAM-system measuring dental attrition and the analysis of aDNA using high-frequency sequencing. The project collaboration involved scientists from the Institute for Pre- and Protohistoric Archaeology, the Institute for Clinical Molecular Biology, the Department of Conservative Dentistry and Parodontology of the CAU Kiel as well as the Landesamt für Denkmalpflege Hessen. Contributing CRC members are C. Rinne (D2), B. Krause-Kyora and A. Nebel (both F4).

Rinne, C., Fuchs, K., Muhlack, J., Dörfer, C., Mehl, A., Nutusua, M., Krause-Kyora, B. 2016. Niedertiefenbach. Ein Galeriegrab der spätneolithischen Wartberggruppe südwestlich von Niedertiefenbach (Landkreis Limburg-Weilburg, Hessen). Praehistorische Zeitschrift 91/2, pp. 284–316. ISSN (Online) 1613-0804, ISSN (Print) 0079-4848, DOI: www.degruyter.com

Fieldwork and excavation in the Ukraine: The Copper Age Mega-Site Maidanetske

The research collaboration of sub-project D1 sheds light on formation and decline processes of population agglomerations in Chalcolithic Cucuteni-Tripolye mega-sites. During August and September 2016, extensive fieldwork and excavation of the mega-site Maidanetske (ca. 3900–3600 BCE) took place in central Ukraine. 

Fieldwork and excavation of the mega-site MaidanetskeExcavation and documentation of the uncovered chalcolithic building structures in the mega-site Maidanetkse, Ukraine (photo: S. Jagiolla).

Geomagnetic prospections suggest ditch structures with superimposing by pits in the northern area of the settlement. A trench of 10 m length revealed a vertical stratigraphy composed of several features and containing material culture remains, which will help to clarify the chronological sequence of the structures and might contribute to establish an internal chronology of the site itself.

The excavation of and sample extraction from a so-called “mega-structure” (large building structures) was one highlight of the campaign. Due to their enormous dimensions as well as their central and separated positions along main traffic arteries, these structures indicate to have had special public functions. Further investigations and analyses of the collected sample archives are important aspects in the examination and evaluation of this and alike buildings.

Documented profiles and sampling of open spaces between the house ring structures and undeveloped inner settlement parcels provide sufficient material for palaeobotanical and geoarchaeological analyses. The results shall help to understand the purpose and utilization of open spaces and road-like structures in Cucuteni-Tripolye mega-sites.

Further geomagnetic prospection in the northern part of the area gained new information about a preceding settlement, constructed in similar spatial and structural patterns. Drilling surveys and sample collections in the surrounding wetlands now provide appropriate palynological archives to reconstruct prehistoric ecological conditions as well as the development of the mega-site and its impact on the natural environment.


Activities Oldenburger Graben LuftbildSampling of monoliths from a soil profile intercepting a house in trench 110, Maidanetske 2016 (photo: M. dal Corso).

New interdisciplinary research on Maidanetske – a key site oft the chalcolithic Trypillia Mega-site phenomena

In European prehistory, population agglomerations of more than 10,000 inhabitants per site are an infrequent phenomenon. The unexpected discovery of the Trypillia mega-sites excavated nearly 50 years ago by Soviet, Ukrainian and Moldavian archaeologists using a multidisciplinary approach, uncovered the remains of more than 2000 houses spread over 250 hectares. Since then, the sites stay in focus of archaeological research at the border if the North Pontic Forest Steppe zone ca. 4100-3400 BCE.

Geomagnetischen Prospektionsareale

Overview of the geomagnetic survey area (ca. 150 ha) of Maidanetske with a detailed view of the northern area (Müller et al. 2017, fig. 3).

One of the key mega-sites is Maidanetske in the Central Ukraine. In 2013, an interdisciplinary European team of researchers started new excavations at the site. The analyses provoked many  questions: why, how and under what environmental conditions did Trypillia mega-sites develop? How long did they last? Were social reasons responsible for the transformation processes triggering changes in residence and settlement habit? The new publication “Maidanetske 2013. New excavations at a Trypillia Mega-site” addresses these questions by describing and interpreting findings and material culture of the site. Contributing authors of the CRC 1266 are Johannes Müller, Robert Hofmann, Wiebke Kirleis, Stefan Dreibrodt and Marta Dal Corso (sub-projects D1, F2, F3).

These questions are also research issues of the CRC 1266 sub-project D1 “Population agglomerations at Tripolye-Cucuteni mega-sites”. Paleo-ecological, geophysical as well as chronological analyses of recent and future research activities involve sub-projects F2, F3, G1 and G2. In order to understand urbanisation and agglomeration processes, the scientific discourse of D1 closely relates to the sub-projects C2 and E2.

„Maidanetske 2013. New Excavations at a Trypillia Mega-site“ ist als 16. Band der Reihe „Studien in Ostmitteleuropa“ im Rudolf Habelt Verlag unter der ISBN 978-3-7749-4018-5 erschienen.

For pdf-view click on the cover:

Titel Maidanetske 2013

Müller J., Hofmann R., Kirleis W., Dreibrodt S., R. Ohlrau, Brandstätter L., Dal Corso M., Out W., Rassmann K., Burdo N., Videiko M. 2017. Maidanetske 2013. New Excavations at a Tryplilia Mega-site. Studien zur Archäologie in Ostmitteleuropa, Bd 16. Dr. Rudolf Habelt GmbH, Bonn. ISBN 978-3-7749-4018-5. 

Photos PhD-Workshop 2017

PhD talks at the Johanna-Mestorf-Kolleg in Schloss Gottorf
PhD talks at the Johanna-Mestorf-Kolleg in Schloss Gottorf
Restorer Gabriele Zink explains restoration procedures of leather
At the Archaeological Central Workshop (AZW)
Dr. Joachim Schultze, AZW: Wood preservation techniques
Doctoral Students of the PhD Workshop 2017

New Publications

New Publications
Hirse groß
Cover Kakucs Turján
Kakucs Turján
image-20181119121946-1.png
Axe-fitting
Axe-fitting from Duvensee, W1
Think global, act local !
Culture in the Caucasus
Oldenburg_settlement
Oldenburg settlement
Lake Stymphalia
Lake Stymphalia
Gesichtsurnen
Gesichtsurnen
Atlasplants
Atlasplants
Bildschirmfoto 2019 06 27 um 10.24.22
4.2 ka Event
4.2 ka Event
Climate curve
Climate curve
Climate curve
Climate curve
Climate curve
Cover How´s Life
Cover How´s Life
Cremated human remains from Aarupgaard
Cremated human remains from Aarupgaard
Recent, charred tubers of tuber oat grass
Recent, charred tubers of tuber oat grass
Impressions of textiles on Bronze Age pottery from the site Bruszczewo, Poland
Two new articles about textiles and textile production coming soon in the proceedings “The Textile Revolution in Bronze Age Europe”
Plan of the excavation site of Schönhagen-Brodersby
Plan of the excavation site of Schönhagen-Brodersby
Radiocarbon datings of Altendorf
Transformation of social practice: The Altendorf grave as a place of memory
Dark Ages in the North?
Geomagnetic plan of the site of Monte da Contenda
An enclosure, settlement systems and climatic changes
Microscograph of a ceramic thin section
Starčevo ceramic technology: the first potters of the Middle Danube Basin
Cover „Megalithic monuments and social structures. Comparative studies on recent and Funnel Beaker societies“
Volume 5 of the CRC 1266-series STPAS has been published
Cover „Gender Transformations in Prehistoric and Archaic Societies'“
Volume 6 of the CRC1266-series STPAS has been published
Cover photo STPAS#08 480px
Cover photo STPAS#08 220px
Stable carbon isotope composition of individual fatty acids in lipid residues of animal origin from Neolithic vessels of the Megalith tomb Wangels and domestic site Oldenburg
pol eco small
The early Neolithic site of Vráble
Map with relevant sites and the extent of the CTC and mentioned contemporaneous archaeological complexes
Map with relevant sites and the spatiotemportal extent of the CTC and mentioned contemporaneous archaeological complexes
STPAS#07 Ohlrau 2020
Cover photo STPAS#10
Title diary

Retreat 2019

Retreat 2019
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EAA Bern

EAA Bern
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EAA Bern

EAA Bern
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EAA Bern

EAA Bern
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Retreat Rendsburg

Retreat Rendsburg
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Kiel form above

Kiel form above
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DAK2020 Horizonte

DAK2020 Horizonte
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Logo CRC1266 pixel

Logo CRC1266 pixel
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Job vacancies

Job vacancies
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Black Diamonds

Black Diamonds
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News
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