CRC 1266 - Scales of Transformation

Biweekly Colloquia - Graduate School Human Development in Landscapes & SFB 1266

Biweekly Poster 2017

Biweekly Colloquium - Conflicts between hill 'people' and valley 'civilizations' in Eastern Himalayan landscapes

May 08, 2017 from 04:15 PM to 05:45 PM

Leibnizstraße 1, room 204

Conflicts between hill 'people' and valley 'civilizations' in Eastern Himalayan landscapes: Northeast India, Myanmar, Yunnan

Dieter Reinhardt (Rhine-Waal University)

Part of the state building process since around 5ooo years is the myth of 'barbarians' who constantly tried to violently appropriate the economic surplus of 'civilizations' with state structures. Actually, the relation between 'civilizations', often based on new technologies of irrigation in river valleys, and 'barbarian outsiders', normally living in less productive landscapes like hills or semi-deserts, were much more complex. In general, not the 'outsiders', but more often the 'civilizations' conquered land and resources by force and other means. In the case of Eastern Himalayan (Northeast India, eastern part of Bangladesh, Myanmar, Southwest China) colonization of hilly areas intensified in the 18th century and accelerated further after the independence of India/Pakistan in 1947 and the foundation of the PR China in 1949.

The lecture will present tentative results of an ongoing research project, whose three subprojects are dealing with the following questions:

a) How far ongoing political, cultural and violent conflicts between militant groups in Northeast India and Myanmar and state security forces are connected to the old contradiction and narrative between hill 'people' and valley 'civilizations'? What is the relation between these conflicts and new forms of 'identity politics' or 'ethnonationalism'?

b) In both regions, different layers of modern and traditional property and land use rights exist. What are the effects of these layers and to which extent village economies in hilly areas are still based on 'collective use' of 'common property resources' (Elionor Ostrom)?

c) Current infrastructure projects, transboundary resource exploitation (e.g. forest, fossil fuels, minerals) and trade in the landscapes of Northeast India-Myanmar-Yunnan are conceptionalized as 'new Asian regionalism'. How fare these developments are increasing or decreasing the tensions between social groups living on hills and in valleys? Does a 'new region' actually emerge in these landscapes?

Results of several field study tours in 2015 and 2016 in border areas of Northeast India/North Myanmar and Yunnan/West.Myanmar will be presented. 

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Biweekly Colloquium - Social hierarchy, prestige goods, warfare... What‘s behind Bronze Age fortifications?

May 22, 2017 from 04:15 PM to 05:45 PM

Leibnizstraße 1, room 204

Social hierarchy, prestige goods, warfare... What‘s behind Bronze Age fortifications?

Mateusz Jaeger (AMU Poznan)

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Biweekly Colloquium - Coping with crisis and risk in the recent and ancient Mediterranean: surplus grain, livestock and cuisine

Jun 12, 2017 from 04:15 PM to 05:45 PM

Leibnizstraße 1, room 204

Coping with crisis and risk in the recent and ancient Mediterranean: surplus grain, livestock and cuisine

Paul Halstead (Sheffield University)

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Biweekly Colloquium - New postdoctoral fellows of GSHDL (Kiel University)

Jun 26, 2017 from 04:15 PM to 05:45 PM

Leibnizstraße 1, room 204

The Pipe and the Bell: comments on human-object relations.

Artur Ribeiro

A quantitative and diachronic study about social inequality based on archaeological cultures

Ralph Großmann

Rock of Ages - Anthropomorphic rock art during the Bronze Age of Southern Scandinavia

Christian Horn

Core Questions on the Domestication of the Pig in the Middle East

Max Price

Urban space and perception at Selinous between the Classical and Early Hellenistic periods

Nicola Chiarenza

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Biweekly Colloquium - Divergent levels of resilience. The impact of social inequality on vulnerability towards sand drifts in the pre-modern coversand belt.

Jul 10, 2017 from 04:15 PM to 05:45 PM

Leibnizstraße 1, room 204

Divergent levels of resilience. The impact of social inequality on vulnerability towards sand drifts in the pre-modern coversand belt.

Maïka de Keyzer (Utrecht University)

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