CRC 1266 - Scales of Transformation

Event archive

Biweekly Colloquium: “Persistence, Land Use and Sustainability: Exploring Long-term Trends in Urban Duration in the Fertile Crescent”

Nov 22, 2021 from 04:15 PM to 05:45 PM

Virtual Meeting

Prof. Dr. Dan Lawrence  •  Department of Archaeology, Durham University

Persistence, Land Use and Sustainability: Exploring Long-term Trends in Urban Duration in the Fertile Crescent

The Fertile Crescent, encompassing present-day Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, Jordan and southeast Turkey, saw the emergence of the world’s first indigenous urban communities ca. 6,000 years ago, with cities a feature of the region ever since. These developed in diverse environmental settings, including the dry-farming plains of Northern Mesopotamia, the irrigated alluvium of Southern Mesopotamia and the more variegated landscapes of the Levant. The emergence of cities also coincides with a decoupling of settlement and climate trends, suggesting urbanism may have enhanced the adaptive capacity of societies to withstand changing climatic conditions. Urban forms followed a variety of different trajectories, with a much more sporadic and episodic history in the dry farming plains of the North and West of the study region compared to the stable build up in the irrigated South. In this paper we use a dataset of several thousand urban sites spanning the entire region and dating from the earliest urban forms to later territorial empires, to examine trends in urban sustainability through time. We use duration of occupation as a proxy for sustainability and compare urban trajectories at a variety of scales. Such an approach allows us to examine the relationships between city size, environmental conditions, infrastructural investment and urban sustainability. Our results show that the millennial timescales available through archaeology can allow us to identify the sorts of political, social, and ecological conditions required for urban sites to persist through time.

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Lunchtime Seminar: “Transformative behaviours, interactions and settlement patterns in forager and horticultural societies”

Nov 17, 2021 from 12:00 PM to 01:30 PM

Leibnizstraße 1, R. 204

Focus 2: Subproject C1
Jan Piet Brozio

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Archaeological Colloquium: „Making connections with Mesolithic Ireland“

Nov 15, 2021 from 06:30 PM to 08:30 PM

Virtual Meeting

Prof. Dr. Graeme Warren School of Archaeology, University College Dublin

Abstract

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Biweekly Colloquium: “Nuna Nalluyuituq (The Land Remembers): Combining ethnographic inquiry and remote sensing to study traditional Yup’ik subsistence in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta”

Nov 08, 2021 from 04:15 PM to 05:45 PM

Hybrid Meeting (Leibnizstraße 1, R. 204/Online)

Prof. Dr. Sean Gleason  •  Hampden-Sydney College, Virginia

Nuna Nalluyuituq (The Land Remembers): Combining ethnographic inquiry and remote sensing to study traditional Yup’ik subsistence in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta

This lecture outlines a collaborative, multidisciplinary approach to the study of Yup’ik subsistence in Southwest Alaska's Yukon-Kuskokwim (Y-K) Delta. Because distinctive vegetation patterns appear on ancestral cultural sites during the summer months, the analysis of multispectral imagery in combination with local Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) is useful for classifying, documenting, and studying the cyclical, year-long practice of Yup’ik subsistence known collectively as Yuuyaraq (trans. “The way we genuinely live”).  In sum, this lecture highlights the role of Yuuyaraq in past Yup’ik societies before considering how these practices have changed and what ethnographic inquiry and remote sensing can tell us today about these changes.

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Lunchtime Seminar: “Theories and models to refine our understanding of past transformations”

Nov 03, 2021 from 12:00 PM to 01:30 PM

Leibnizstraße 1, R. 204

Focus 1: Subprojects A1 & A2
Daniel Knitter

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Biweekly Colloquium: “Linking Settlement and Quarry: Chert Acquisition from Early to Late Neolithic on the Southeastern Swabian Alb”

Oct 25, 2021 from 04:15 PM to 05:45 PM

Hybrid Meeting (Leibnizstraße 1, R. 204/Online)

Prof. Dr. Lynn E. Fisher  •  Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Illinois Springfield

Linking Settlement and Quarry: Chert Acquisition from Early to Late Neolithic on the Southeastern Swabian Alb

Abstract PDF

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Archaeological Colloquium: „Archemy – advancing multiproxy dietary analysis in the Baltics“

Oct 18, 2021 from 06:30 PM to 08:30 PM

Hybrid Meeting (Johanna-Mestorf-Straße 2-6, Johanna-Mestorf-Hörsaal/Online)

Dr. Ester Oras and Dr. Mari Tõrv Institute of Chemistry / Institute of History and Archaeology, University of Tartu

Abstract

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Lunchtime Seminar

Jul 07, 2021 from 12:00 PM to 01:30 PM

Virtual Meeting

"Settlements on former Shorelines: where and why"
Erica Corradini et al

Closing discussion/ Exhibition Task Force

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!!!Cancelled!!! Archaeological Colloquium: „What does a craft approach to Bronze Age metalworking look like, and what does it do?“

Jul 05, 2021 from 06:30 PM to 08:30 PM

Virtual Meeting

Dr. Maikel H. G. Kuijpers • Faculty of Archaeology, Leiden University

Abstract

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Biweekly Colloquium: “The chalcolithic ›mega site‹ of Valencina de la Concepción (Seville): New investigations in the Northern Sector”

Jun 28, 2021 from 04:15 PM to 05:45 PM

Virtual Meeting

Dr. Thomas Schuhmacher  •  German Archaeological Institute (Madrid Department)

The chalcolithic ›mega site‹ of Valencina de la Concepción (Seville): New investigations in the Northern Sector

The ›mega-site‹ of Valencina de la Concepción extends throughout the northeast limit of the Aljarafe Plateau, 6 km to the West of modern-day Seville in the South of Spain. It consists of a huge necropolis area with several monumental tombs and a settlement area which covers an area of about 200 hectares. In the margin of a project financed by the DFG the German Archaeological Institute investigates the Northern sector of this ›mega-site‹ by means of geophysical surveys, excavations and scientific studies. The geomagnetic survey of a surface of more than 19 ha. revealed a concentric system of at least five ditched enclosures and one smaller rectangular one, as well as a large amount of pits, semi-circular huts excavated in the ground, as well as possible hypogea. For the first time we have also been able to sequence the infill of almost all chalcolithic ditches by means of manual drillings. During the excavations carried out in the municipal plot of Cerro de la Cabeza a dense sequence of chalcolithic pits, semi-excavated huts and workshops have been documented and first stratigraphic cuts through some of the ditches have been undertaken. The chrono-typological definition of the ceramics, as well as a series of 14C dates obtained by AMS begin to reveal the sequence of the settlement. Beginning in the late Neolithic/Early Chalcolithic (end of the 4th millennium BC) it experiments its peak occupation during the Middle Chalcolithic (first half of the 3rd millennium BC). During its transition to the Late Chalcolithic (mid 3rd millennium BC) there seems to be a reduction in the size of the settlement, seeming to become even more reduced during the Bell-Baker phase. At about 2200 BC the excavation of ditches as well as the settlement itself suddenly ends. We also present some evidence that seems to indicate a short and not very intense re-occupation of the Cerro de la Cabeza area during the later Early Bronze Age (beginning of the 2nd millennium BC).

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Lunchtime Seminar

Jun 23, 2021 from 12:00 PM to 01:30 PM

Virtual Meeting

"Conceptualizing an anatomy of transformations: DPSIR, theorization, semiotics, and emergence"
Artur Ribeiro et al

"Scales of abstraction: The CRC 1266 conceptual approach from heterogeneous data to interpretations"
Nicole Taylor et al.

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Archaeological Colloquium: „Process and Dynamics of the Transition to Farming in the Mediterranean (7000-5500 BC)“

Jun 21, 2021 from 06:30 PM to 08:30 PM

Virtual Meeting

Dr. Thomas P. Leppard Department of Anthropology, Florida State University / Aarhus Institute of Advanced Studies, Aarhus University

Abstract

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Biweekly Colloquium: “Motherhood and environment in Bronze Age Central Europe”

Jun 14, 2021 from 04:15 PM to 05:45 PM

Virtual Meeting

Dr. Katharina Rebay-Salisbury  •  Austrian Archaeological Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences

Motherhood and environment in Bronze Age Central Europe

Motherhood includes a range of cultural choices and practices in addition to the biological framework of sexual reproduction, which are subject to research within the ERC-Starting Grant funded project ‘The value of mothers to society’. This presentation will present the latest findings from new analytical approaches such as tracing the stress of pregnancies and childbirth in female skeletons, applying organic residue analysis to understand what prehistoric baby bottles contained, and using peptide analysis in children’s dental enamel to determine their sex. In the spirit of the Cluster of Excellence ROOTS, this talk will aim to focus on how changing environments may influence strategies of mothering and childrearing.

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Lunchtime Seminar

Jun 09, 2021 from 12:00 PM to 01:30 PM

Virtual Meeting

"Archaeodemography in the Weichselian Lateglacial: Structural equation models as model for collaboration in the CRC?"
Tim Kerig et al.

"Indicators of transformation processes: Pattern recognition on settlement structures, climatic conditions and environmental data"
Franziska Engelbogen et al.

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Archaeological Colloquium: „Urban Elite Culture - A Survey and Methodological Study of Aristocracy and Civic Elites in Trading Towns of the Southwestern Baltic (12th-14th c.)“

Jun 07, 2021 from 06:30 PM to 08:30 PM

Virtual Meeting

Dr. Luisa Radohs  University of Münster

Abstract

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Biweekly Colloquium: “The (Re)Shaping of Pompeii in the Early Imperial Period: New insights from the Porta Stabia neighbourhood”

May 31, 2021 from 04:15 PM to 05:45 PM

Virtual Meeting

Prof. Dr. Steven Ellis  •  Department of Classics, University of Cincinnati

The (Re)Shaping of Pompeii in the Early Imperial Period: New insights from the Porta Stabia neighbourhood

Much is already well known about the urban shape of Pompeii by the time of its destruction in 79 CE.  And though good inroads have been made into the various developments over time that brought it to this shape, still not all of these readings benefit from the sub-soil excavations of more recent years that have targeted the episodic growth spurts of the city.  This lecture draws on some recent excavations at Pompeii to show the extent to which some of the most pivotal changes to the city occurred in the early Imperial period.  These excavations, under the auspices of the University of Cincinnati and the American Academy in Rome, targeted two town blocks of the city, as well as several adjacent, civic structures (the fortification wall and gate, the streets, and the Quadriporticus); the excavations covered more than ten separate building plots (c. 4000m2) made up of shops, houses, and hospitality establishments.  This ‘behind-the-scenes’ view of some of the latest excavations at Pompeii opens up an entirely new perspective on the city, with a special focus on the developments that reshaped the city - both socially and structurally - in the early Imperial period. 

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Lunchtime Seminar

May 19, 2021 from 12:00 PM to 01:30 PM

Virtual Meeting

"Agricultural Adaptation to climatic anomalies in the Late Holocene : palaeoclimate, palaeoenvironmental and archaeobotanical records for the Northern German Plain"
Dragana Filipović et al.

"Diachronic perspective of transformation processes"
Jutta Kneisel et al.

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Archaeological Colloquium: „Die Wewelsburg - Von Mythen und Legenden. Ein Ort des dark heritage“

May 17, 2021 from 06:30 PM to 08:30 PM

Virtual Meeting

Kirsten John-Stucke, M.A. Kreismuseum Wewelsburg

Abstract

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Biweekly Colloquium: “Animated stones and animal sacrifices in the highlands of Odisha (India): environment as socio-cosmic order”

May 10, 2021 from 04:15 PM to 05:45 PM

Virtual Meeting

Prof. Dr. Roland Hardenberg  •  Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main

Animated stones and animal sacrifices in the highlands of Odisha (India): environment as socio-cosmic order

This presentation focuses on the ritual practices of swidden cultivators in the highlands of Odisha (India) called Dongria Kond, who are recognised as one of the many tribal societies and original inhabitants (“Adivasi”) of this area. Like other Kond tribes, they regularly practice large scale buffalo sacrifices to their earth goddess, who is represented by a stone setting in the center of each village. The earth goddess is regarded as the mother of the Kond and is responsible for their well-being. However, she is only one of the many deities and spiritual beings who according to the Kond populate their environment. The sun and the moon, the wind and the rain, mountains and hills, plants and animals, forests and rivers – the whole socio-cosmic space is, in the view of the Kond, populated by various powers with whom they maintain relationships. Ritual practices such as the buffalo sacrifices are major occasions when these relationships are activated and maintained through communication, possession and the sacrifice of animals and food. Some of these divine actors are represented by stones of varying sizes, including large megaliths representing the husband of the earth goddess. The presentation will particularly focus on the nexus between stones, deities, social categories, sacrificial offerings, and local notions of well-being.

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Lunchtime Seminar

May 05, 2021 from 12:00 PM to 01:30 PM

Virtual Meeting

"Scales and dimensions of political practice and patterns of power relations in Prehistory"
Maria Wunderlich et al.

"Creation of cultural landscapes: decision-making and perception within specific ecological settings"
Marta Dal Corso et al.

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Archaeological Colloquium: „Waldveränderungen in der hessischen Mittelgebirgszone vom Neolithikum bis zur Römerzeit - Spiegelbild anthropogener und klimatischer Einflüsse“

May 03, 2021 from 06:30 PM to 08:30 PM

Virtual Meeting

Dr. Astrid Stobbe Institute of Archaeological Sciences, Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main

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Biweekly Colloquium: “Social change and textile technology: a comparative perspective on the Aegean, Italy, and central Europe during the first millennium BC”

Apr 26, 2021 from 04:15 PM to 05:45 PM

Virtual Meeting

Dr. Bela Dimova  •  British School at Athens

Social change and textile technology: a comparative perspective on the Aegean, Italy, and central Europe during the first millennium BC

This paper will explore the roles which textiles and textile technology played in periods of social change among different societies in the Aegean, the Italic peninsula, and central Europe. We will focus on two main themes: social stratification and the changing organisation of production. During the 8th–5th century BC, societies in different parts of Europe underwent parallel developments, including the increase in visible hierarchies and the growth of settlements, sometimes categorised as urban. The conspicuous consumption of textiles, played an important role in this process. Elites used textiles in different ways in key arenas of social competition – burials, weddings, religious activities. The archaeological record for this includes remains of cloth in burials, iconography of dress and furnishings, in addition to literary sources. We will explore the parallels and different regional traditions in the ways elites used textiles to assert and materialise local identities or wider connections, to show off wealth or demureness. The organisation of textile production offers another perspective on social change, by considering the issues of standardisation, specialisation, and the growing importance of exchange. While some aspects of textile manufacture changed (e.g., yarn manufacture), others did not. Despite the limited evidence for textile workshops, households remained important sites of production, which tells us something both about the nature of the craft and the socio-economic context in which it was practiced.

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Lunchtime Seminar

Apr 21, 2021 from 12:00 PM to 01:30 PM

Virtual Meeting

"Exhibition Task Force: Everything remains different? – Getting to the point and sharpening research content!"
Anna Elena Reuter et al.

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Archaeological Colloquium: „Beyond the house: reconsidering outdoor spaces in the Greek Neolithic“

Apr 19, 2021 from 06:30 PM to 08:30 PM

Virtual Meeting

Dr. Evita Kalogiropoulou Department of Archaeology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

Abstract

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Biweekly Colloquium: “Landscape affordances – methodological approaches in computational archaeology”

Apr 12, 2021 from 04:15 PM to 05:45 PM

Virtual Meeting

Dr. Michael Kempf Institute of Archaeology and Museology, Masaryk University, Brno

Landscape affordances – methodological approaches in  computational archaeology

Functional landscape connectivity and spatial distribution of resource patches have long been considered important driving factors of human-environment interactions. In this context, human activity spheres, movement patterns, and situational decision-making represent the spatio-temporal expression of how individuals and groups perceive and transform their immediate surroundings in the process of landscape construction. This process is based on various environmental and cognitive variables such as group memory or individual demands and perceptions – a combination of different empirically, theoretically, and methodologically derived concepts, which are not often included jointly in archaeological and geographical research. A potential approach to overcome these limitations is the concept of landscape affordances, which entails dynamic and processual feedbacks of an individual or a group and the environment in the moment of mutual interaction and integrates human ingenuity in the production of landscapes, ecological processes, and sociocultural patterns. Deriving from psychology research of the late 1970’s by James J. Gibson, affordances describe the phenomena of propositions emanating from objects within a specific environment. Consequently, landscape affordances are non-static, actual, and potential confrontations between observer and particular resources or functions distributed among the accessible realm of the observer. In this lecture, the conceptual framework of landscape affordances is used to evaluate its potential in computational landscape archaeology and geography through the integration of different temporal scales and time-series analyses.

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Lunchtime Seminar: How do we link pattern recognition with transformations in prehistoric and archaic societies?

How do we link pattern recognition with transformations in prehistoric and archaic societies?

Feb 17, 2021 from 12:00 PM to 01:30 PM

Leibnizstraße 1, Raum 204 / virtual meeting

Internes Treffen

Hybrides Treffen (attandace & digital)

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Biweekly Colloquium: “Making Sense of Scottish Neolithic Funerary Monuments and Practices”

Feb 08, 2021 from 04:15 PM to 05:45 PM

Virtual meeting

Alison Sheridan National Museums Scotland

Making Sense of Scottish Neolithic Funerary Monumentsand Practices

Megalithic chamber tombs – of widely varying shape and size – and non-megalithic funerary monuments loom large in the visible traces of Scotland’s Neolithic, but they formed just one element in a diverse range of practices concerned with dealing with, relating to, and commemorating the dead. This lecture explores this diversity and draws out the regional and chronological trends that can now be discerned, thanks to our growing body of radiocarbon dates. It also attempts to understand the origins, meanings and significance of these funerary monuments, and to identify the ‘drivers’ for the specific trajectories of change that we see.

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Lunchtime Seminar: Pattern recognition and its methodological and technical discussion (Subprojects G and Z)

Subprojects G and Z: Pattern recognition and its methodological and technical discussion

Feb 03, 2021 from 12:00 PM to 01:30 PM

Leibnizstraße 1, Raum 204 / virtual meeting

Internes Treffen

Hybrides Treffen (attandace & digital)

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